peermediation

“What is Peer Mediation?” – A Simple Video Introduction

Peer mediation is problem-solving with youth, by youth. It is a process by which two or more students involved in a dispute meet in a safe and confidential setting to work their problems out with the assistance of a trained student mediator.

If you want to know what peer mediation looks like in action, here’s a helpful little video to get you started!

(All video footage taken at the Peacemakers Conference 2018)

 

Peer Mediation – An Introduction

Peer mediation is problem-solving with youth, by youth. It is a process by which two or more students involved in a dispute meet in a safe and confidential setting to work their problems out with the assistance of a trained student mediator.If you want to know what peer mediation looks like in action, here's a helpful little video to get you started! (All video footage taken at the Peacemakers Conference 2018)

Posted by Peacemakers Consulting Services on Wednesday, 31 October 2018

 


For more pictures and videos of the Peacemakers Conference 2018, please visit the Peacemakers Facebook Page.

As Singapore’s leading peer mediation expertsPeacemakers has an extensive track record of managing and delivering conflict resolution training for youth at both local and international levels. If you would like to train your youth to better manage conflict, let us know how we can help via email at mediate@peacemakers.sg.

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And a Little Child Shall Lead Them – Peacemakers 2018

On 12 July 2018, our Training and Development Advisor, Professor Joel Lee, published a blog post on the Kluwer Mediation Blog entitled “And A Little Child Shall Lead Them – Peacemakers Conference 2018”. His blog post is reproduced in full below.


I have in previous entries (July 2012 and July 2013) written about a peer mediation initiative called the Peacemakers Conference. The purpose of the Peacemakers Conference is to teach 13-16 year olds how to resolve conflicts amicably in a workshop cum competition format. This year’s Peacemakers Conference was held from 20 to 22 June 2018.

As in previous years, we asked students from different schools to work together to create a visual metaphor for mediation. This started in 2015 and has become a regular feature in the Peacemakers Conference. Metaphors from previous years be found in the entries for November 2015August 2016 and July 2017.

This year, the students came up with 8 (plus 1) visual metaphors which I would like to share with readers in this entry. For each of these, an image of the students presenting the metaphor is shared along with a description of the metaphor.

I would like to acknowledge the efforts of Ms. Charmaine Yap, Ms. Samantha Lek, Mr. Sean Lim and the Peacemakers Facilitation team for capturing the description and images of each of the metaphors that appear below.

 

MEDIATION METAPHORS

GROUP 1: Mediation is Magic

Mediation is Magic

Mediation is magic, and the Patronus deer that is summoned when Harry Potter casts the Expecto Patronum spell was chosen to represent the idea of magic. The spell is a charm that drives away life-sucking beasts, but is famously difficult to cast. This is like mediation – the difficult nature of practising mediation, mediating conflict, and solving conflicts and problems. When Harry Potter casts this spell, he has to recall a happy memory. However, he had to try this a lot of times, and only succeeded when he tried very hard. Similarly, if mediators do not mediate properly, the mediation will not work well, and might even make the situation worse.

Magic is also universal among everyone. From the old to the young, everyone appreciates magic. This is similar to peacemaking and mediation – everyone there is there to appreciate and understand it.

Mediation is also magical because by merely asking questions, people can be guided together. Just as there are endless types of spells, there are endless types of solutions in mediation. It is up to the mediator to ask parties questions to guide them along.

The Patronus is a beautiful animal. Harry Potter’s Patronus is a stag. Similar to mediation, it is the unpredictable and beautiful result of parties working on a framework to resolve the problem together.

 

GROUP 2: Mediation is the Lighthouse that guides relationSHIPS

Mediation is a Lighthouse

The lighthouse is a guide in the dark. The lighthouse symbolises the mediator, and the ships symbolise the parties. The lighthouse guides ships to land without piloting them. Similarly, the mediator guides parties to a solution without giving it to them. The darkness of the night sky symbolises how parties are unable to see each other’s perspectives, but the light from the lighthouse helps them to see each other and their common destination.

 

GROUP 3: Mediation is like a Camera Tripod

Mediation is like a Camera Tripod

The tripod’s three stands represent the mediator and two parties. All three support one another for the foundation of the picture, and have to support one another in order for the camera to work. They also maintain level ground for the camera. If any one of these elements are missing, the picture will not be beautiful.

The camera has to be on a level plane in order to work. This represents the mediator’s neutrality. The camera cannot stand without the mediator or one of the parties missing, and will fall. This shows how crucial each party is to the mediation.

The height of the tripod can be adjusted. This represents the flexibility of altering perspectives throughout the mediation session.

Just like how pictures in the camera can be deleted, conflict can be deleted at mediation. All the pictures taken are stored on the memory card, and are gone from the camera when the memory card is removed. This represents confidentiality at mediation.

Everyone can exercise their autonomy to participate by being in the picture. Similarly, anyone can participate in mediation and benefit from the process.

The camera’s zoom out feature allows the mediator to move away from the narrow tunnel vision and look at the big picture, while the focus feature allows parties to focus on what others are saying and listen attentively to one another.

 

GROUP 4: Mediation is a Missing Puzzle Piece

Skit:
– “I have a puzzle but the two pieces won’t fit.”
– “Should I cut it up?”
– “But the puzzle won’t look nice?”
– “I found another piece.”
– “Oh wow it fits perfectly!”

Mediation is a Missing Puzzle Piece

Mediation is like a missing puzzle piece that connects two parties together that are imperfect. Having to cut a puzzle piece in order for them to fit is like parties sacrificing part of their interests in order to come to a compromise. Like a missing puzzle piece, mediation allows parties to reach a mutually acceptable solution that doesn’t require either to give up what is important to them. A beautiful picture is formed by the pieces fitting together, the way a solution is reached when parties and the mediator come together.

 

GROUP 5: Mediation is a Pair of Swans

Mediation is a Pair of Swans

Mediation is a pair of swans, because swans are gentle and peaceful. When both swans are put together, the shape their necks make is a diamond. Just like how a diamond is hard to obtain, mediation is hard to master. Both also play important roles in society. A diamond can be used as a tool to shape or carve other things, while mediation is a tool we use to sort out problems.

The spectacles on the swans show that viewing things through different lenses can help make things clearer, and help you see things from different perspectives. The bridge in the background is to commemorate the previous year’s winning metaphor.

 

GROUP 6: Mediation is a Compass

Mediation is a Compass

A maze has multiple entry points, each leading to the centre via a unique route. Similarly, parties enter mediation with a unique perspective. What they see, experience, and the obstacles they face can be very different from one another. When they reach the end point, there is conflict. Parties think they know each other’s stories since they are in the same space. They assume that they had experienced the same thing since they are in the same maze, but what they had gone through may be different. This is a form of tunnel vision – assuming what they experienced is the same. When that is not the case, it leads to conflict.

A compass needs a needle, cardinal directions, and its casing to work. Likewise, mediation cannot proceed if either party or the mediator is absent.

Confidentiality: The fact that the compass is enclosed in an opaque maze represents confidentiality since no one outside the maze can get an idea of what is happening in the maze.

Neutrality: Only when the compass is on a flat surface will it work well. Similarly, neutrality must be maintained by the mediator for the most effective outcome.

Autonomy: Parties choose whether they want to hold the compass or to be guided by it. The compass helps parties see different sides and perspectives to the issues by allowing them to learn about the stories of different parties. This avoids tunnel vision.

This is where mediation comes in. Mediation helps parties see different perspectives to the complicated issue by learning about the other parties’ stories. Because parties have different orientations, turning in the same direction might not necessarily set the other party on the same route. However, a compass will set parties on the same route (by guiding them North, South, East, or West), towards a solution that they can all agree on together.

Mediation is a compass because it can help parties see the complete picture, set common ground, and guide them through conflict.

 

GROUP 7: Mediation is a Tightrope

Mediation is a Tight Rope

A tightrope is very thin, and you have to be very focused to not lose balance. Maintaining balance is like maintaining neutrality. If you don’t maintain neutrality, you will fall. Similarly, the mediation process will not proceed well if the mediator is not neutral.

Although the tightrope is very thin, it still connects two points together. Similarly, mediation brings two parties (represented by the mountains) together. We (the students) have written everyone’s names on the tightrope in order to convey that everyone has undertaken the challenge of mediating between two parties.

 

GROUP 8: Mediation is a Needle

Mediation is like a Needle

There are different kinds of needles.

Threading Needle

A threading needle patches up holes in fabric, and binds different pieces of fabric together to make something beautiful. Likewise, the mediator enables parties to reach resolution. Just like how the needle guides the thread, the mediator guides parties. However, the needle can also cause hurt – it can pierce you and cause you to harm yourself. Similarly, mediation can also cause harm if it is used wrongly.

Syringe Needle

Mediation can help people recover from emotional wounds. A syringe draws out blood, like how mediation draws out conflict. A syringe needle must also be precise – specific mediation techniques need to be applied depending on the context.

Acupuncture Needle

Acupuncture needles are pin needles – they need to be inserted precisely and accurately, otherwise the patient will be in a lot of discomfort. Similarly, if the mediator says something that makes parties uncomfortable, then parties will be in a situation of discomfort. However, if the acupuncture is done well, blood will flow well into the areas that are stressed, relieving the patient of pain. This is similar to the relief mediation provides if it is done well.

 

SPECIAL MENTION: Mediation is a Toilet

Mediation is like a Toilet

The three principles of mediation are: (i) autonomy, (ii) neutrality, and (iii) confidentiality.

  • Autonomy: Just like mediation, you can choose when, where, or how you use the toilet. You can use it in the day or night, and decide how long you want to use it for. You can even use what type of toilet you want to use – the squatting type, sitting type, or even a potty.
  • Neutrality: Long or short, big or small, the toilet will not judge.
  • Confidentiality: Whatever is made in the toilet, stays in the toilet. After the work is done and you use the flush, all evidence is destroyed.

The cubicle is like a mediation centre. You can go whenever you like, and leave only when you are satisfied.

The 4 stages of the mediation process is similar to going to the toilet.

  • Opening: You are apprehensive because you don’t know what you will find in a toilet. But when you are really urgent, you go in anyway.
  • Information Gathering: This is when you release the poop. Sometimes there is so much that you don’t know where to begin. But once you get comfortable, everything starts pouring out. Some get constipation, while others get diarrhoea. Everyone goes through pain, and it takes time and effort, but things will come through sooner or later. After that, you can step out and take a breath of fresh air.
  • Problem Solving: The flushing comes after you have been satisfied. It is only when you get everything out, that you are ready to start afresh.
  • Closing: Now you can step out of the smelly cubicle and start afresh, since you have gotten everything out of the way.

“Pissmakers – Helping you get your shit together”

That brings us to the end of another installment of visual metaphors for mediation! I hope readers found some of these as inspiring as we did!

 


For more pictures and videos of the Peacemakers Conference 2018, please visit the Peacemakers Facebook Page.

As Singapore’s leading peer mediation experts, Peacemakers has an extensive track record of managing and delivering conflict resolution training for youth at both local and international levels. If you would like to train your youth to better manage conflict, let us know how we can help via email at mediate@peacemakers.sg.

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Peacemakers Conference 2018 – Report

By Mark Lim, on behalf of the organisers of the Conference

The ninth iteration of the Peacemakers Conference took place from 20 to 22 June 2018, where a total of 91 students attended the three day workshop-cum-competition to learn how to resolve conflicts amicably. With 14 secondary schools taking part this year, this was the biggest turnout since the Conference first started in 2010!

Listed in alphabetical order, the schools that took part this year were: Anglo-Chinese School (Barker Road); Clementi Town Secondary School; Commonwealth Secondary School; Evergreen Secondary School; Holy Innocents’ High School; Jurong West Secondary School; Kent Ridge Secondary School; Montfort Secondary School; NUS High School of Math & Science; Pasir Ris Secondary School; Paya Lebar Methodist Girls’ School; Peicai Secondary School; Raffles Girls’ School; and Yishun Town Secondary School.

 

Lessons on Peacemaking through Mediation

Over the course of 3 days, participants were introduced to the principles and processes of mediation and encouraged to consider how they can apply them in their daily lives to resolve disputes amicably. Through lessons and interactive exercises, participants learned how to manage the emotions of disputants, inspire confidence in the mediation process, explore underlying interests, and much more! In addition to practicing these new skills in hypothetical but realistic role-play scenarios, participants were introduced to how these concepts they were learning about could make crucial differences in real life situations through inspiring accounts shared by Master Mediator Mrs Chia Swee Tin.

Participants also had the opportunity to learn outside of the figurative classroom on a field trip to the Supreme Court of Singapore. There, they were introduced to the judicial system of dispute resolution, and learned from representatives of the Singapore Mediation Centre (SMC) about how even warring litigants have been able to seek out win-win solutions to their problems through mediation.

 

Creative Application of Lessons

Applying the lessons learnt, participants took part in two friendly competitions: a mediation metaphor exercise; as well as a series of mock-mediation sessions where participants were assessed on their ability to co-mediate day-to-day disagreements.

In the mediation metaphor exercise, participants were encouraged to work in groups to create a visual metaphor that best encapsulates what mediation is to them. The sheer creativity and imagination of the participants were astounding! While every group presented on unique and outstanding metaphors, the team that ultimately emerged first place shared that to them, “Mediation is like a Camera Tripod”. In their presentation of their design, the team demonstrated their grasp of key mediation concepts of neutrality, confidentiality, flexibility, party autonomy, and a focus on the other party’s interests instead of just their own. Special mention also went to the group that shared that “Mediation is like a Toilet”, which parties are free to use however they like without judgment, and because “whatever is made in the toilet, stays in the toilet”. Indeed the creativity and wisdom of the young often puts all of us to shame.

In the mock mediation competition, participants role-played as mediators, demonstrating to our guest judges their ability to creatively resolve conflicts they are likely to encounter in real life, such as disputes among classmates in group projects, and emotional fights between long-time friends. After four grueling rounds of competition, NUS High School of Math & Science and Jurong West Secondary School emerged as the top two teams.

The finalists had the unenviable task of mediating in front of our distinguished panel of judges at the final round of the competition. This year, we were honoured to have our judging panel consist of Judge of Appeal Judith Prakash, Mr Loong Seng Onn, and Professor Joel Lee. Set in the beautiful David Marshall Moot Court at the Singapore Management University’s School of Law, our finalists were given the challenge of mediating a dramatic and emotionally-charged school conflict, with the added pressure mediating in front of an audience of all the facilitators and participants of the Conference.

Both teams rose to the challenge and put up solid performances worthy of the occasion. Commenting on the outstanding performance by the two finalists, Executive Director of SMC, Mr Loong Seng Onn, noted to an agreeing audience how the caliber of the student mediators was akin to even that of professional mediators with many years of practice. Justice Prakash also commended the finalists for their ability to grasp such difficult concepts and apply them with such proficiency in such a short space of time. After a lengthy process of deliberation, Jurong West Secondary School eventually emerged as the champions for the second consecutive year – the first time any school has won the Conference twice in a row!

Aside from the finalists, five participants were recognised for demonstrating great spirit in learning and growing as mediators. They are Schifra Na’lya Bte Roni (Peicai Secondary School), Jayden Heng (Anglo-Chinese School (Barker Road), Nur Kaisah Bte Abdul Kadir (Evergreen Secondary School), Liu Yunting (Raffles Girls’ School), and Stella Tan Si Xuan (Yishun Town Secondary School).

While winners had to be declared for these aspects of the Conference, it was the unanimous opinion of all the judges and facilitators that the participants this year were exceptionally talented, and that we are confident that they will go on to be effective peacemakers in their respective communities and spheres of influence.

 

Thank You!

The organisers would like to express our sincerest appreciation to the many people who helped to make this Conference a great success. First and foremost, we would like to thank Judge of Appeal Judith Prakash, as well as Professor Joel Lee and Mr Loong Seng Onn, who kindly took time out of their busy schedules to judge the final round of the competition.

Next, we would like to thank Raffles Girls’ School for being such gracious hosts over the course of the entire Conference. Special thanks go to RGS Principal, Mrs Poh Mun See, and teachers, Ms Audrey Chen and Mr Joseph Toh. We also wish to thank Singapore International Dispute Resolution Academy and Singapore Management University for hosting our Finals at their beautiful campus.

The Conference would not have been a success without our many sponsors and supporters including the SMC, the Singapore International Mediation Institute, the Community Mediation Unit, Lim Siang Huat Pte Ltd, our guest judges for all the qualifying rounds, as well as the teachers and schools of all of the participants.

Finally, we would also like to thank the participants of the Conference, who have demonstrated impressive and inspiring amounts of creativity, tenacity, and eagerness to learn. It is our hope and belief that they will go on to bring great change to the lives around them not just as peacemakers today, but as the Peacemakers of tomorrow.

 


For more pictures and videos of the Peacemakers Conference 2018, please visit the Peacemakers Facebook Page.

As Singapore’s leading peer mediation experts, Peacemakers has an extensive track record of managing and delivering conflict resolution training for youth at both local and international levels. If you would like to train your youth to better manage conflict, let us know how we can help via email at mediate@peacemakers.sg.

shayne

Peace Talks – Shayne Phee

In our interview series, entitled “Peace Talks”, we speak to peacemakers with different backgrounds and life stories, and ask them to share their thoughts and reflections. 

This edition of “Peace Talks” features Shayne Phee from Raffles Girls’ School:

 

Q: How did you feel about the Peacemakers Conference 2017?

It was a really unique experience as I really enjoyed getting the opportunity to learn and hear from law students themselves and mediators in the workforce! It was enriching to be able to learn the proper and professional way to deal with conflict – something that I’ll not be able to learn in the classroom!

 

Q: What was your favourite part of the Conference?

My favourite part was during the simulations where we either got to act as totally unreasonable people in conflict or act as the mediators trying to intervene and make peace. For one, it was very fun being as unreasonable and angry as I wanted haha! On a more serious note, at the end of the day it was very fulfilling to have the chance to put what I had learnt to the test. When my friends tried to give me a hard time during the simulations, it was actually fun and enriching to be able to practice handling relationships and conflicts. It really taught me a lot about myself and about resolving conflicts, which can come in handy in life.

 

Q: What is an example of you applying what you learned in the Conference in real life?

Sometimes when planning for events, stress overcomes us and that’s when tension starts to build up. Two of my close friends involved in planning for our school carnival had some differences and misunderstandings. This led to them arguing over the words they said that might have hurt each other and the way that things should be run. Using the mediation skills that I had learnt from this conference, I managed to put myself in both their shoes and play the role of the mediator to encourage them to talk it out. They managed to resolve the matter peacefully, and still remain close friends now!

 

Q: If you had one piece of advice for incoming participants of the Peacemakers Conference 2018, what would it be?

My advice to the participants would be to keep an open mind and to not be afraid to ask questions. I remember due to my curiosity, my friends and I kept asking a lot of questions. Some of our questions even stumped the speaker haha! It can be quite awkward at first, but it is only through clarifying your doubts that you can really learn and explore outside the box.

 


For more pictures and videos of the Peacemakers Conference 2017, please visit the Peacemakers Facebook Page.

As Singapore’s leading peer mediation experts, Peacemakers has an extensive track record of managing and delivering conflict resolution training for youth at both local and international levels. If you would like to train your youth to better manage conflict, let us know how we can help via email at mediate@peacemakers.sg.

xinyu

Peace Talks – Sia Xinyu

In our interview series, entitled “Peace Talks”, we speak to peacemakers with different backgrounds and life stories, and ask them to share their thoughts and reflections. 

This edition of “Peace Talks” features Sia Xinyu from Raffles Girls’ School:

 

Q: How did you feel about the Peacemakers Conference 2017?

I stepped into Peacemaker’s Conference 2017 expecting to learn nothing more than the basic mediation procedures, but actually stepped out with a whole new bank of knowledge about so much more! It was a fulfilling experience that I am extremely grateful to have been given, and I know the participants of this year’s Conference will enjoy it as much as I did!

 

Q: What was your favourite part of the Conference?

My favourite part would definitely have to be meeting new people and learning from them. As we were split into different groups, we all had to chance to interact with students from different schools. Listening to my groupmates’ opinions really helped to broaden my horizon as I heard from viewpoints I would have never even thought of. Of course, interactions include making new friends and I’m thankful to have been placed in a really friendly group (shoutout to gwy, jingyi, farzana, emily and hong jun!) right from the beginning ( ´∀` )♡

 

Q: What is an example of you applying what you learned in the Conference in real life?

It would have to be between my team members of a project, and what made things complicated was that they were both close friends of mine. The process was not easy at all, and what one of the presenters shared during the Conference last year will always stick with me: “It’s always the hardest mediating for people you care deeply about”. It’s very true, but we also have to remember that a simple “I understand” can go a long way in detangling a conflict.

 

Q: If you had one piece of advice for incoming participants of the Peacemakers Conference 2018, what would it be?

Open your eyes, ears, and most importantly, heart! Don’t be scared of the Conference because there’ll be many helpful and (really) cheerful facilitators around to guide you, so just have fun and learn as much as you can ~ All the best! ( •̀ᄇ• ́)ﻭ✧

 


For more pictures and videos of the Peacemakers Conference 2017, please visit the Peacemakers Facebook Page.

As Singapore’s leading peer mediation experts, Peacemakers has an extensive track record of managing and delivering conflict resolution training for youth at both local and international levels. If you would like to train your youth to better manage conflict, let us know how we can help via email at mediate@peacemakers.sg.

dawnlok

Peace Talks – Dawn Lok

In our interview series, entitled “Peace Talks”, we speak to peacemakers with different backgrounds and life stories, and ask them to share their thoughts and reflections. 

This edition of “Peace Talks” features Dawn Lok (centre) from Raffles Girls’ School:

 

Q: How did you feel about the Peacemakers Conference 2017?

Peacemakers Conference was really enriching! Apart from it being a good mix of hands-on and theory, what I liked the most about Peacemaker’s Conference 2017 was that whatever was taught was really applicable and useful! I was able to apply the mediation skills when a group seemed to be under a dilemma (I wouldn’t call it a conflict but there were differing views!), and that helped to effectively solve the problem! It also taught me to be more observant to what others say and uncover the message (interests) they are trying to bring across, and help them with it if possible! The Conference was truly a gem!

 

Q: What was your favourite part of the Conference?

I really enjoyed the mediation “trials” we had! Even though it was nerve-wracking and stressful, but it was where I really learnt to make meaning out of what I’ve learnt in the theory sessions. Being able to get out of my shell and “fight it out” with my peers from other schools was really memorable too!

 

Q: What is an example of you applying what you learned in the Conference in real life?

As part of my role in my leadership board, I had to oversee a group for them to plan a training session. Midway through the planning, however, they faced some problems with deciding how the session should be structured. I was originally unsure of how I should tackle this situation, but I remembered what was taught in the Conference! So I got them to lay out their opinions, as well as why they hold them. From there, they were able to see how both opinions could complement each other, and in the end, they managed to integrate both ideas!

 

Q: If you had one piece of advice for incoming participants of the Peacemakers Conference 2018, what would it be?

It would be to truly immerse yourself in the experience, and come with an open heart to learn! Even though it may seem to be a dry and unrelated Conference, trust me it’s not! The skills are really transferable, and you’re a lucky one to be selected/appointed to join this Conference! :))) So pay attention during the theory sessions, understand the concepts, try your best during the mediation trials, learn from your peers, and most importantly, enjoy yourself! Have fun! XD

 


For more pictures and videos of the Peacemakers Conference 2017, please visit the Peacemakers Facebook Page.

As Singapore’s leading peer mediation experts, Peacemakers has an extensive track record of managing and delivering conflict resolution training for youth at both local and international levels. If you would like to train your youth to better manage conflict, let us know how we can help via email at mediate@peacemakers.sg.

huiyun

Peace Talks – Tan Hui Yun

In our interview series, entitled “Peace Talks”, we speak to peacemakers with different backgrounds and life stories, and ask them to share their thoughts and reflections. 

This edition of “Peace Talks” features Tan Hui Yun from Hougang Secondary School:

 

Q: How did you feel about the Peacemakers Conference 2017?

I felt that the Peacemakers Conference was one of the most meaningful events I’ve ever experienced as I learnt a lot about mediation! I also managed to make new friends, and even had the opportunity to work with them. I really loved the Conference as I got to enjoy and learn at the same time!

 

Q: What was your favourite part of the Conference?

I loved the competition rounds because they were really interesting. We got to practice our mediating skills, and also got a chance to role play. The judges even gave us constructive feedback for improvement, making the overall learning experience extremely meaningful.

 

Q: What is an example of you applying what you learned in the Conference in real life?

As a leader, discussions are common, and I often face situations where disagreements would lead to conflicts. After the Conference, I became more aware of both parties’ thoughts and facial expressions when dealing with conflicts, and I am also better equipped at resolving such arguments. I learnt that it is important to avoid being subjective and one-sided when facing such situations, and most importantly to always remain calm. I became more confident when solving conflicts between my peers, and also managed to come up with solutions for them.

 

Q: If you had one piece of advice for incoming participants of the Peacemakers Conference 2018, what would it be?

Try to step out of your comfort zone and mix around! As you’ll be grouped with people from different schools, bonding with them will guarantee you a better learning experience.

 


For more pictures and videos of the Peacemakers Conference 2017, please visit the Peacemakers Facebook Page.

As Singapore’s leading peer mediation experts, Peacemakers has an extensive track record of managing and delivering conflict resolution training for youth at both local and international levels. If you would like to train your youth to better manage conflict, let us know how we can help via email at mediate@peacemakers.sg.

bhoomi

Peace Talks – Bhoomi

In our interview series, entitled “Peace Talks”, we speak to peacemakers with different backgrounds and life stories, and ask them to share their thoughts and reflections. 

This edition of “Peace Talks” features Bhoomi from Chua Chu Kang Secondary School:

 

Q: How did you feel about the Peacemakers Conference 2017?

It was the first time I attended something like that. To be honest though, I was excited but superrr scared on the first day, especially when I found out that my friends and I were split into different groups. But after we got into our groups, the fun we had was immense. Peacemakers definitely taught me a lot of things every single day. I don’t think the values and skills I learnt here can be taught anywhere else. Every moment of this conference was one the best times I have had.

 

Q: What was your favourite part of the Conference?

My favourite part was when we went for the competition rounds and our skills were put to the test. I think that was the best type of assessment I have ever had. The acting I got to do when I was playing a party, and the laughter that I had to hold in when I was mediator because the parties were putting up a fantastic show, were AMAZING!

 

Q: What is an example of you applying what you learned in the Conference in real life?

There were times where I had to face friends who were in deep conflict because of things that happened in Secondary 1, which they only decided to bring up and fight about in Secondary 4. Since I am good friends with both of them, I knew what I had learnt at the Conference would come in handy then. I was able to stay neutral and hear out both of their views, then I helped them in unfolding each of their situations so that both of them could be able to see each other’s perspectives too. Although they are still not best friends today, I am glad that they now acknowledge one another with a smile when they pass by.

 

Q: If you had one piece of advice for incoming participants of the Peacemakers Conference 2018, what would it be?

To those attending this conference this year: Don’t be nervous, and be enthusiastic in whatever you do. Be open to learning things you never knew existed, and have loads and loads of fun!

 


For more pictures and videos of the Peacemakers Conference 2017, please visit the Peacemakers Facebook Page.

As Singapore’s leading peer mediation experts, Peacemakers has an extensive track record of managing and delivering conflict resolution training for youth at both local and international levels. If you would like to train your youth to better manage conflict, let us know how we can help via email at mediate@peacemakers.sg.

chloe

Peace Talks – Chloe Lee

In our interview series, entitled “Peace Talks”, we speak to peacemakers with different backgrounds and life stories, and ask them to share their thoughts and reflections. 

This edition of “Peace Talks” features Chloe Lee from Raffles Girls’ School:

 

Q: How did you feel about the Peacemakers Conference 2017?

I absolutely loved it! Ranging from the visits to the courts and NUS law school, and to the interesting lessons and mediation exercises, it was a very enriching experience learning about mediation as a whole. The instructors for each breakout group were really cool too!

 

Q: What was your favourite part of the Conference?

Definitely the mediating competition and actually practising mediation. It was really fun working with students from other schools, to try our hand at mediation as amateurs, and of course roleplaying as well! 🙂

 

Q: What is an example of you applying what you learned in the Conference in real life?

I use what I learnt in the Peacemakers Conference all the time. I don’t panic when I am caught in the middle of an argument now, because I am clearer about what to say and the right time to say it! One example would be at home when my siblings are quarrelling – the resolution often needs someone to help both parties clear the air and talk things out!

 

Q: If you had one piece of advice for incoming participants of the Peacemakers Conference 2018, what would it be?

Have lots of fun, ask lots of questions and don’t be shy! It’s a really rare opportunity to get to experience mediation in such a fun way, so make the most out of it!

 


For more pictures and videos of the Peacemakers Conference 2017, please visit the Peacemakers Facebook Page.

As Singapore’s leading peer mediation experts, Peacemakers has an extensive track record of managing and delivering conflict resolution training for youth at both local and international levels. If you would like to train your youth to better manage conflict, let us know how we can help via email at mediate@peacemakers.sg.

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Peace Talks – Brendan Cheong

In our interview series, entitled “Peace Talks”, we speak to peacemakers with different backgrounds and life stories, and ask them to share their thoughts and reflections. 

This edition of “Peace Talks” features Brendan Cheong from Hougang Secondary School:

 

Q: How did you feel about the Peacemakers Conference 2017?

I felt that the Peacemakers Conference 2017 was very well organised with a suitable amount of time given to both theory and practical sessions.

 

Q: What was your favourite part of the Conference?

My favourite part of the Conference are the practical sessions where students get to put their mediation knowledge into practice with real-life scenarios given to us. These sessions are very fulfilling as we get to apply what we have learnt, and they also allow us to gain experience handling different people that may be involved in a situation where mediation is required.

 

Q: What is an example of you applying what you learned in the Conference in real life?

An example of me applying what I had learnt throughout the 3 days of the Conference would be a conflict that two of my best friends had. Knowing that I was in a difficult position as I could not afford to be bias in any manner, I decided to make use of my new knowledge of mediation to help me in this matter. After going through all the motions, both parties managed to reach a suitable conclusion of apologising to each other and became best friends again ever since.

 

Q: If you had one piece of advice for incoming participants of the Peacemakers Conference 2018, what would it be?

One piece of advice I would give to incoming participants would be to attend each day with an open mind. Although it might be difficult for us to focus at times, the knowledge taught is really worth the effort to stay awake for.

 


For more pictures and videos of the Peacemakers Conference 2017, please visit the Peacemakers Facebook Page.

As Singapore’s leading peer mediation experts, Peacemakers has an extensive track record of managing and delivering conflict resolution training for youth at both local and international levels. If you would like to train your youth to better manage conflict, let us know how we can help via email at mediate@peacemakers.sg.

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